Liliane Duncan

Graphic Design and Multimedia Designer

Introduction

The purpose of my portfolio is to demonstrate my lifelong commitment to promote, elevate and foster good design through various digital media formats.

Fulfilling this potential will require cultivating knowledge in education technology, exploring creative solutions in multimedia design, and identifying opportunities to collaborate and build strong partnerships.

My approach to finding solutions that work is inherent in my passion as a designer. The pages from the magazine and newspaper samples you will see, demonstrate the successful collaboration with editors and photographers to produce award-winning layouts.

Technology has premeditated and changed many industries from print to education. The evolution of disruptive innovation and technologies are evident in all areas of modern society. Today, higher educational organizations instruct millions of students in online/digital learning–an area that is fast growing. This shift has propelled me to redirect my focus on how good design can be applied to digital media.

As I enter this new phase, digital medium–I hope to inspire and foster learning, by creating rich experiences through effective design.

The future landscape is unknown; my belief is, in order to make valuable contributions in the field, remaining resilient and committed to growth is important to building a strong foundation.

About Me

A Graphic Design and Multimedia professional, with expertise in both the technical and creative sides of design. Skilled at implementing software packages and Web-based tools, I combine imaginative approaches with practical application. My attention to detail and deadline oriented work ethic stems from a broad ranging background that encompasses newspaper, magazine, book publication and web design.

My past roles, serving as an Instructional Technologist at George Washington University, School of Nursing, I provided graphic design, digital media production, and web content development for the School of Nursing programs websites and academic programs. Other recent projects for The Washington Post included an array of designs for multiple special sections, from Travel, Business and Weekend. At both Scholastic Magazine and Entertainment Weekly, I demonstrated a versatility in typography design, visually enhancing articles spotlighting the celebrity of the moment, and creating attractive, readable pages that appealed to young readers. My knowledge of the illustrative demands of the design process resulted in distinctive, eye catching packages that seamlessly blended graphics and editorial content.

I hold a BFA in Graphic Design from School of Visual Arts in New York, a Web Design Certificate from Boston University, Center for Digital Media. Currently, I am pursuing a Master in Technology Leadership from The George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

Resume (coming soon)

Philosophy

“All Great Achievements Require Time” –MAYA ANGELOU

Maya Angelou’s quote, “All Great Achievements Require Time” sums up the journey of my professional development. Learning from setbacks, overcoming weaknesses, building upon each experience, taking incremental steps to reach each milestone–have been the strides form a long and continuous journey. What the future holds will require more of the same. My philosophy involves the active engagement in the learning process, exploration of new technology, collaboration with stakeholders and creative experimentation–to ultimately empower and positivity benefit all participants.

Projects

Collection of Artifacts and Reflection Statements

The collection of artifacts examines an in-depth reflection of my digital portfolio. The process of reflection has transformed my outlook on developing multifaceted learning objects and graphic dsign. The journey has made me aware of the importance of being flexible and open to change–allowing creativity to happen for the greater good.

Artifact: Needs Analysis

Assessment to study and
collect data

DESCRIPTION

An indication of what the artifact is:

A former classmate and I partnered in a graduate course to design an Instructional Module Unit for Decoding the Nutritional Label. We conducted a needs analysis assessment to study and collect data to better understand the needs of the target audience, which comprised undergraduate and graduate students. Specifically, we wanted to learn more about the target audience’s knowledge, attitudes, skills, and habits (KASH).

An indication of how the artifact was used

We used a needs analysis to gather information about the audience and design an instructional module, as a tool to help students make healthy food choices and understand the basic components of a nutritional label.

An indication of the group of individuals who were influenced in using the artifact

During the process of conducting the needs analysis, we conducted a survey to collect information on students’ current KASH as they relate to nutrition labels. We surveyed each of the KASH categories to gain an understanding of students’ current and desired understanding. The student participants who completed the survey were surprised at some of the things they learned from the survey.

The results of the survey showed that 53% of participants could not correctly define a calorie, 63% of participants could not correctly define cholesterol, and 7% of participants could not correctly define carbohydrates. In addition, 82.2% of participants could not correctly identify the size of 1.2 ounces based on a hand measurement, 42% could not correctly identify 1 cup, 78% could not correctly identify 1 teaspoon, and 59% could not correctly identify 3 ounces. The final data analysis revealed a gap in student knowledge and proved that the results of the needs analysis would greatly influence their use of the development of a nutritional module tool.

Information about when and/or how often the artifact was used, and Other pertinent information

Over 14 weeks, we developed our needs analysis and conducted a survey. The data analysis was collected by coordinating with a university professor and 30 students, to solicit feedback from the survey to gather KASH data as they relate to nutritional labels. The survey contained 12 questions about nutritional labels. As the data were collected, we generated pie, bar, and line graphs to be displayed in our final reporting.

ANALYZE & APPRAISE

The statement includes an analysis of the artifact that provides essential information about why the artifact was included. This statement includes an explanation of how the artifact relates to the framework. This statement might also have other exceptional characteristics such as how it connects this artifact to other artifacts.

Conducting the needs analysis assessment was critical helping us learn about our target audience. However, the secondary purpose of the assignment was for our team to gain web design skills by developing a site that would host the assessments findings. We researched many tools before making a decision to develop our site on Weebly an easy to use web 2.0 platform that allows users to create a website.

The culmination of needs analysis and website are at the center of intended goal that shows how design plays a major role in the final presentation. The assignment criteria for creating the site that required consideration of design and multimedia principles. Layout and design were essential in the development phase. Other important principles included having a fundamental understanding of HTML/coding; CSS cascading style sheets; search engine optimization (SEO) techniques; developing templates; and designing and using effective typography, color, and page structure relations.

The statement includes an appraisal of the artifact that provides a detailed demonstration of the writer’s perception of its impact and effectiveness. The statement may also be exemplary in that it points out (when appropriate) specific areas within the artifact to illustrate what has been stated, and it shows the relationship between the artifact and the writer’s philosophy.

After we conducted the needs analysis, we gathered comments and asked for user feedback via Google Forms to learn more about the impact of the nutritional tool and the overall learning experience. The results of the commentary successfully provided insight on the target audience, which enlightened our perspective as to how the audience defined and used nutritional labels. The exceptional, detailed work in collecting data, finding the right group of students to survey, and attention to the detail of design is aligned with my work ethic. We did not shortchange the process or bypass any of the feedback we gathered.

TRANSFORMATION

The statement includes an expression of the writer’s “transformation” through the artifact.

Many aspects of conducting a needs analysis were transformative in terms of carefully measuring the knowledge to the deliverable service. The students we studied had variable sets of knowledge and understanding of how to read and use nutritional labels. Some used the labels regularly, others rarely, and some never. The process was experimental and informative. An important aspect of the assessment was that it provided me with an opportunity to collect data, communicate effectively, and understand the importance of being concise with content.

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Artifact: IMU Decoding The Nutritional Label

Instructional Module Unit for Decoding the Nutritional Label

DESCRIPTION COMING SOON

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Artifact: Clinical Compliance

Clinical compliance orientation for new Bachelor of Science in Nursing students

DESCRIPTION COMING SOON

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Artifact: Communication in Quality & Safety

Scenario highlights communication problems that can affect quality and safety in nursing care

DESCRIPTION COMING SOON

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Artifact: Pediatrics: Developmental Stages

Interactive module, learners explore biological, motor, psychosocial, cognitive and social development stages,

DESCRIPTION COMING SOON

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Artifact: Medical Terminology

Overview of medical terminology

DESCRIPTION COMING SOON

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Artifact: ESL Learning in a New Language: Success in Health Care

Learning in a New Language module ESL

DESCRIPTION COMING SOON

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Artifact: Medication Administration (Case Study)

Case-Based Learning Activity,

DESCRIPTION COMING SOON

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Artifact: The Digital Research Challenge

Case-Based Learning Activity

DESCRIPTION COMING SOON

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Artifact: Web Design-Contemporary Issues in Grief, Loss and Resilience

Summer Institute on Aging

DESCRIPTION COMING SOON

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Artifact: Graphic Design

Editorial page designs

DESCRIPTION

An indication of what the artifact is:

The artifacts include an array of editorial page designs from multiple sections of The Washington Post and Entertainment Weekly magazine. The editorial page and layout design demonstrate versatility in typography design, photography, graphics, and conceptual ideas for creating attractive, distinctive, eye-catching packages that seamlessly blend graphics and editorial content.

An indication of how the artifact was used

Editorial and newspaper content is provided by media companies to millions of consumers to inform, educate, and entertain. The collection of artifacts provides examples of individual editorial pages integrated into the overall package to consumers.

An indication of the group of individuals who were influenced in using the artifact

The Washington Post, a widely circulated newspaper published in Washington, D.C., was formerly owned by the Graham family, who sold it to Jeff Bezos, in 2015. The Washington Post is regarded as one of the leading daily American news organizations, reporting on top local and national news. Entertainment Weekly, a major weekly consumer magazine of 10+ million print subscribers, covers popular culture with a focus on industry insider news as well as movie, television, book, and music reviews. Both companies are highly influential in their respective markets.

Information about when and/or how often the artifact was used, and other pertinent information:

Designing editorial page layouts is not always an easy task. It involves collaborating with editors, photographers, freelance contributors, and art directors to manage projects from concept to execution. Once this process is completed, the designer has a clear direction of how the assigned story should be carried through the design/production process. At first, the task seems daunting. The designer spends a day conceptualizing, discussing ideas to an approach, researching graphic elements, and finding inspiration that will visually enhance the storytelling.

As I reflect on how the thoughts, ideas, and concepts came together during the design process, I realize it is like figuring out how to piece together a complicated puzzle. Until the first click of the mouse to display the text, headlines, and graphics or photos onto a blank page of desktop publishing software, it is not obvious what steps should be followed. First you tap into what seems familiar: increase the headline, expand the art, align the text in columns, and follow the grid on the desktop template. As these elements are moved around, a design begins to take shape and theories of graphic design principles are applied to begin the multiple iterations, exhausting every possible solution. This process becomes formulaic, but the results are never predictable. The originality of each design successfully conveys the essence of the story and solves design challenges in unexpected ways.

Having had opportunities to design many page layouts, I greatly respect and trust the theories and principles of graphic design. My experiences have allowed me to attain, a high visual standard while exploring my full potential.

ANALYZE & APPRAISE

The statement includes an analysis of the artifact that provides essential information about why the artifact was included. This statement includes an explanation of how the artifact relates to the framework. This statement might also have other exceptional characteristics such as how it connects this artifact to other artifacts.

The most pivotal moment in designing one magazine process was working on a cover design under deadline. The assigned editorial director, art director, and editor of the story came over to my desk to discuss the use of the cover photo thirty minutes prior to the deadline for submitting files for production. The editorial director was adamant about changing the image because he thought it did not represent the essence of the story. Both the editor and art director disagreed. The discussion went back and forth; the clock was ticking, and no decision had been made. Some of the proposed ideas included changing the headline or altering or cropping the image to resolve the issue. With little room for error, I began looking for possible options among some of the photographs that were originally rejected. I suggested solutions such as enhancing, cropping, or resizing the images; making the headline the focal point; and rearranging the content on the cover. The discussion went well past the deadline, and production of the magazine came to a complete halt—a situation that was costly and time consuming. At 3:10 p.m., while I frantically clicked the mouse and moved elements around on the page, the group collectively came to a consensus and approved a layout.

While not all magazine deadlines are frantic, most are tense toward the end of production, and for many reasons, tension occurred frequently during our deadlines. Once we reached the end of the process, however, we always celebrated a moment of pride, determination, and re-commitment to values that exemplify our work ethic. As a member of the team, I find that the most rewarding part of the process by far is the feeling of collaboration to bring about a resolution.

The statement includes an appraisal of the artifact that provides a detailed demonstration of the writer’s perception of its impact and effectiveness. The statement may also be exemplary in that it points out (when appropriate) specific areas within the artifact to illustrate what has been stated, and it shows the relationship between the artifact and the writer’s philosophy.

This experience made me aware of the importance of being flexible and open to change, even at the last minute. It is critical to the magazine’s brand for employees to be able to come up with solutions to problems, whether that means changing an image on deadline or receiving a new headline after a design is approved. A willingness to listen to new ideas, such as suggestions for changes in art elements, allows a collaborative team to make good decisions for the greater whole.

TRANSFORMATION

The statement includes an expression of the writer’s “transformation” through the artifact.

The experiences I have gained from designing page layouts have been transformative in the following ways: (a) I have the utmost confidence in my skills, talent, and commitment to creating exceptional work; (b) I have a conviction that hard work made me better at my craft; and (c) I stay motivated by exploring and learning new skills and tools that fuel my passion to learn more. Professionally, I am more resilient in knowing that there are solutions to problems, and I know that thinking critically will positively affect the outcome. Looking ahead at future goals, I will focus on tapping into my strengths and working on the weaker areas that might be hindering my professional growth.

Artifact: Videos

Video

DESCRIPTION COMING SOON

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We all need people who will give us feedback. That's how we improve.
-Bill Gates